SYMPOSIUM 2013

Reading List

READING LIST:
HOW TO TAKE
PLEASURE IN
BEING WHERE YOU ARE
– MARIA FUSCO

ANNE CARSON
Plainwater. New York: Vintage, 1995
“You can never know enough, never work enough, never use the infinitives and participles oddly enough, never impede the movement harshly enough, never leave the mind quickly enough.”

MANUEL DE LANDA
A Thousand Years of Nonlinear History. New York: Zone Books, 1997
“…the emergence of language may now be seen as the result of a double articulation: an accumulation formed by a sorting device consolidated through an act (or succession of acts) of conventionalization or institutionalization. However, this diagram maybe too simple event to account for sedimentary rocks, which also grow ands develop through accretion, that is, the amassing of further materials and the proliferation of existing structure.”

DON DELILLO
Ratner’s Star. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1976
“Our current problem seems to be whether or not the definition of science should include such manifestations as herb concoctions, venerated emblems, sand-painting, legend-telling, ceremonial chants and so on. There’s a distinct methodology to each of these pursuits. Experimentation, observation, identification. Nature is systematically investigated, its data analyzed and applied.”

ANNIE DILLARD
Pilgrim at Tinker Creek. Norwich: Canterbury Press, 1974
“I had been my whole life a bell, and never knew it until at that moment I was lifted and struck.”

PATRICK KAVANAGH
Collected Pruse [sic]. London: Macgibbon & Kee, 1967.
“To know fully even one field or land is a lifetime’s experience. In the world of poetic experience it is depth that counts, not width. A gap in the hedge, a smooth rock surfacing a narrow lane, a view of four small fields – these are as much a man can fully experience.”

JONATHAN LAMB
The Things Things Say. Princeton & Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2011
“…the absence of meaning and the subordination of human interests to those of animals, things, idols and spirits, are proportioned to the ability of the story to tell itself.”

BEN MARCUS
The Age of Wire and String. Illinois: Dalkey Archive Press, 1995
“Figure from which the antiperson is derived; or, simply, the antiperson. It must refer uselessly and endlessly and always to weather, food, birds, or cloth, and is produced of an even ratio of skin and hair, with declension of the latter in proportion to expansion of the former. It has been represented in other figures such as Malcolm and Laramie, although aspects of it have been co-opted for uses in John. Other members claim to inhabit its form and are refused entry to the house. The victuals of the antiperson derive from itself, explaining why it is often represented as a partial or incomplete body or system–meaning it is often missing things: a knee, the mouth, shoes, a heart.”

CARSON MCCULLERS
Reflections in a Golden Eye. London: Penguin Classics, 2001
“The Captain’s agitation seemed more than such a mishap warranted. Standing alone in the woods he was a small man.”

NAN SHEPHERD
The Living Mountain. Edinburgh: Canongate, 2011
“The creatures that dress like the snow to be inconspicuous against it – the ptarmigan, the snow bunting, the mountain hare – are sometimes cheated. They are all white before the mountain is… Few things are more ludicrous in Nature than a white hare ‘concealing’ itself, erect and patient beside a boulder, while all round it stretches a grey-blown world against which it stands too vividly out.”

SIMONE WEIL
War and the Iliad. New York: New York Review Books, 2005
“Thus it happens that those who have force on loan from fate count on it too much and are destroyed.”

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